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[03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje 2007 / Racism: A History - "A Savage Legacy" [03/3]

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Tags: [03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje 2007 / Racism: A History - "A Savage Legacy" [03/3] Examinaremos el impacto del racismo en el siglo XX. Por el 1900 la expansión colonial europea había alcanzado el corazón de Africa. Bajo el mando del rey Leopoldo II   el Congo Belga se había convertido en una gran plantación de caucho. Los hombres   mujeres y niños que fracasaban en conseguir las cuotas de caucho eran desmembrados. El país llegó a ser uno de los grandes escenarios de los grandes genocidios del siglo   y se estima que 10 millones de africanos perecieron bajo el dominio colonial. Género: Historia Duración: 59:00 Racism: A History is a three-part British documentary series originally broadcast on BBC Four in March 2007. It was part of the season of programmes broadcast on the BBC marking the 200th anniversary of the Slave Trade Act 1807   a landmark piece of legislation which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire. The series explores the impact of racism on a global scale and chronicles the shifts in the perception of race and the history of racism in Europe   the Americas   Australia and Asia. The series was narrated by Sophie Okonedo. The series was researched and prepared by the BBC to mark the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Britain (which did not abolish slavery itself) and consists of a chronology of events beginning with the invention of the concept of race in the 17th century as a result of colonisation and slavery and ending in the continued struggle for equal rights that still goes on. The story line narrated by Sophie Okonedo is illustrated by photographs   dramatic representations and on-site filming and is liberally interspersed with interviews with leading researchers and witnesses. "A Savage Legacy" Tim Robinson 4 April 2007 Examines the impact of racism in the 20th century. By 1900 European colonial expansion had reached deep into the heart of Africa. Under the rule of King Leopold II   the Belgian Congo was turned into a vast rubber plantation. Men   women and children who failed to gather their latex quotas would have their limbs dismembered. The country became the scene of one of the century's greatest racial genocides   as an estimated 10 million Africans perished under colonial rule. Experts interviewed[edit] Manning Marable Anthony Appiah James Allen Michael Eric Dyson Thomas Pakenham Adam Hochschild Dr Bambi Ceuppens Prof Deborah Posel Pallo Jordan Dr Barney Pityana Simeon Wright Hazel Carby Lee Jasper Doreen Lawrence Prof Paul Gilroy Synopsis[edit] The final episode begins with the abolition of slavery in the US in 1865 after which black people were denied the vote   remained impoverished and became victim to violence and murder if they resisted racism. Instead of slavery there was Sharecropping   a system that left black people in permanent debt to the landowners. Examinations for the vote were introduced and the Jim Crow laws became the norm for segregation. At the heart of this was a system of political and economic terror with lynching as its most powerful weapon. Often the killing and torture took place to the amusement of large crowds of spectators   and postcards of the proceedings sold throughout the States. The lynching of 17-year-old Jess Washington in 1916 is described in detail   as are riots and murders like the Tulsa race riot of 1921. As James Allen says in regard to why these events have faded from human memory: "White America has maintained to this day control of the history of racial violence as victors. Its as if we live in an occupied country intellectually and as long as white America retains the power and maintains the myth of moral superiority the history will never become fully public and be written into our national conscience." Besides this   black people were characterised as buffoons in traditions like the Blackface. In the name of civilising the African 90% of Africa was divided among the European powers. Leopold II of Belgium set out to become personally wealthy through his seizure of the Congo   where extreme violence   mutilation and other coercive methods forced the local people to obtain rubber and other raw materials. Between 1880 and 1920 about 10 million people   were killed   yet Leopold built an opulent museum to the colonisation of the Congo   which became the venue of one of the first so-called Human zoos that toured Europe throughout the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. Then the words genocide   holocaust and racism became used in connection with the Nazi treatment of the Jews and it became clear that these were abhorrent. However   it did not change the way things were done towards people of colour. In South Africa the system of racial classification did not have the intention of exterminating the black population created a bureaucracy to determine and enforce access to resources along racial lines. This included an illusory face of democracy which enabled the government to obtain the support of international governments. After the Sharpeville massacre   the banning of the ANC and arrest of Nelson Mandela   the attacks became increasingly violent and deaths mounted up. In 1976 student riots led to many schoolchildren being killed as well as Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko. Practically every family in South Africa was in some way affected by the killings and torture. It comes as no surprise that many countries supported South Africa. In the United States African American soldiers returning from the war in 1946 were lynched at the rate of one a week. Protests led finally to the passing of anti-lynching laws. When schools were desegregated   violence erupted   resulting in the death of 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955   the photo of whose mutilated face   testimony of extreme viciousness and hate   bore witness of the white man's savagery towards blacks. Four months later the Civil Rights movement was born   having to deal with years of violent resistance and the murder of two of its leaders   Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. However   even the civil rights legislation could not alleviate the ubiquitous poverty. Britain's race riots and racial controversy led to the Race Relations Act of 1968 and   in retaliation   the Rivers of Blood speech of Enoch Powell. Many years of aggressive policing followed as the new generation of young black men fought for their rights. Finally the murder of Stephen Lawrence and subsequent failure of the legal system to deal appropriately with the investigation proved that Institutionalised racism was part of the problem. The William Macpherson report identified Institutional racism as a situation ““where you have no overt policy saying no one is discriminated against   but all the outcomes of your operations are overtly discriminatory. It is the culture of racism within an organisation that overpowers the formal commitment to equality that produces the racist outcomes." Nevertheless the situation of economic and social inequality of black people in the UK still persists. Across the world racial inequality remains as it was with the majority of white people living relatively well-to-do lives and the majority of black people in abject poverty. In the United States   Color-blind racism consists in three institutions - mass unemployment   mass incarceration and mass disenfranchisement. Of the 2.3 million prisoners in the US   half are black. These   just like ex-convicts   cannot vote for the rest of their lives. Finally we hear the story of The Bell Curve   a bestseller that claimed that black people's poor performance in IQ tests proved their intellectual inferiority. Criticism of this has been given little attention. The book's research was funded by the Pioneer Fund and underpins racial eugenics. Racial privilege endures   continuing to shape destinies the world over. SOURCES http://www.area-documental.com/player.php?titulo=Un%20Legado%20Salvaje http://217.160.176.9/comun/videos/Racism%20_A%20History3of3.mp4 BBC_Four  

[03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje 2007 / Racism: A History - "A Savage Legacy" [03/3] Examinaremos el impacto del racismo en el siglo XX. Por el 1900 la expansión colonial europea había alcanzado el corazón de Africa. Bajo el mando del rey Leopoldo II, el Congo Belga se había convertido en una gran plantación de caucho. Los hombres, mujeres y niños que fracasaban en conseguir las cuotas de caucho eran desmembrados. El país llegó a ser uno de los grandes escenarios de los grandes genocidios del siglo, y se estima que 10 millones de africanos perecieron bajo el dominio colonial. Género: Historia Duración: 59:00 Racism: A History is a three-part British documentary series originally broadcast on BBC Four in March 2007. It was part of the season of programmes broadcast on the BBC marking the 200th anniversary of the Slave Trade Act 1807, a landmark piece of legislation which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire. The series explores the impact of racism on a global scale and chronicles the shifts in the perception of race and the history of racism in Europe, the Americas, Australia and Asia. The series was narrated by Sophie Okonedo. The series was researched and prepared by the BBC to mark the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Britain (which did not abolish slavery itself) and consists of a chronology of events beginning with the invention of the concept of race in the 17th century as a result of colonisation and slavery and ending in the continued struggle for equal rights that still goes on. The story line narrated by Sophie Okonedo is illustrated by photographs, dramatic representations and on-site filming and is liberally interspersed with interviews with leading researchers and witnesses. "A Savage Legacy" Tim Robinson 4 April 2007 Examines the impact of racism in the 20th century. By 1900 European colonial expansion had reached deep into the heart of Africa. Under the rule of King Leopold II, the Belgian Congo was turned into a vast rubber plantation. Men, women and children who failed to gather their latex quotas would have their limbs dismembered. The country became the scene of one of the century's greatest racial genocides, as an estimated 10 million Africans perished under colonial rule. Experts interviewed[edit] Manning Marable Anthony Appiah James Allen Michael Eric Dyson Thomas Pakenham Adam Hochschild Dr Bambi Ceuppens Prof Deborah Posel Pallo Jordan Dr Barney Pityana Simeon Wright Hazel Carby Lee Jasper Doreen Lawrence Prof Paul Gilroy Synopsis[edit] The final episode begins with the abolition of slavery in the US in 1865 after which black people were denied the vote, remained impoverished and became victim to violence and murder if they resisted racism. Instead of slavery there was Sharecropping, a system that left black people in permanent debt to the landowners. Examinations for the vote were introduced and the Jim Crow laws became the norm for segregation. At the heart of this was a system of political and economic terror with lynching as its most powerful weapon. Often the killing and torture took place to the amusement of large crowds of spectators, and postcards of the proceedings sold throughout the States. The lynching of 17-year-old Jess Washington in 1916 is described in detail, as are riots and murders like the Tulsa race riot of 1921. As James Allen says in regard to why these events have faded from human memory: "White America has maintained to this day control of the history of racial violence as victors. Its as if we live in an occupied country intellectually and as long as white America retains the power and maintains the myth of moral superiority the history will never become fully public and be written into our national conscience." Besides this, black people were characterised as buffoons in traditions like the Blackface. In the name of civilising the African 90% of Africa was divided among the European powers. Leopold II of Belgium set out to become personally wealthy through his seizure of the Congo, where extreme violence, mutilation and other coercive methods forced the local people to obtain rubber and other raw materials. Between 1880 and 1920 about 10 million people, were killed, yet Leopold built an opulent museum to the colonisation of the Congo, which became the venue of one of the first so-called Human zoos that toured Europe throughout the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. Then the words genocide, holocaust and racism became used in connection with the Nazi treatment of the Jews and it became clear that these were abhorrent. However, it did not change the way things were done towards people of colour. In South Africa the system of racial classification did not have the intention of exterminating the black population created a bureaucracy to determine and enforce access to resources along racial lines. This included an illusory face of democracy which enabled the government to obtain the support of international governments. After the Sharpeville massacre, the banning of the ANC and arrest of Nelson Mandela, the attacks became increasingly violent and deaths mounted up. In 1976 student riots led to many schoolchildren being killed as well as Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko. Practically every family in South Africa was in some way affected by the killings and torture. It comes as no surprise that many countries supported South Africa. In the United States African American soldiers returning from the war in 1946 were lynched at the rate of one a week. Protests led finally to the passing of anti-lynching laws. When schools were desegregated, violence erupted, resulting in the death of 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955, the photo of whose mutilated face, testimony of extreme viciousness and hate, bore witness of the white man's savagery towards blacks. Four months later the Civil Rights movement was born, having to deal with years of violent resistance and the murder of two of its leaders, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. However, even the civil rights legislation could not alleviate the ubiquitous poverty. Britain's race riots and racial controversy led to the Race Relations Act of 1968 and, in retaliation, the Rivers of Blood speech of Enoch Powell. Many years of aggressive policing followed as the new generation of young black men fought for their rights. Finally the murder of Stephen Lawrence and subsequent failure of the legal system to deal appropriately with the investigation proved that Institutionalised racism was part of the problem. The William Macpherson report identified Institutional racism as a situation ““where you have no overt policy saying no one is discriminated against, but all the outcomes of your operations are overtly discriminatory. It is the culture of racism within an organisation that overpowers the formal commitment to equality that produces the racist outcomes." Nevertheless the situation of economic and social inequality of black people in the UK still persists. Across the world racial inequality remains as it was with the majority of white people living relatively well-to-do lives and the majority of black people in abject poverty. In the United States, Color-blind racism consists in three institutions - mass unemployment, mass incarceration and mass disenfranchisement. Of the 2.3 million prisoners in the US, half are black. These, just like ex-convicts, cannot vote for the rest of their lives. Finally we hear the story of The Bell Curve, a bestseller that claimed that black people's poor performance in IQ tests proved their intellectual inferiority. Criticism of this has been given little attention. The book's research was funded by the Pioneer Fund and underpins racial eugenics. Racial privilege endures, continuing to shape destinies the world over. SOURCES http://www.area-documental.com/player.php?titulo=Un%20Legado%20Salvaje http://217.160.176.9/comun/videos/Racism%20_A%20History3of3.mp4 BBC_Four

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oseido 07/19/2016

[03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje 2007 / Racism: A History - "A Savage Legacy" [03/3][03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje  2007 / Racism: A History - [03/3] Racismo: Una Historia. Un Legado Salvaje 2007 / Racism: A History - "A Savage Legacy" [03/3]

Examinaremos el impacto del racismo en el siglo XX. Por el 1900 la expansión colonial europea había alcanzado el corazón de Africa. Bajo el mando del rey Leopoldo II, el Congo Belga se había convertido en una gran plantación de caucho. Los hombres, mujeres y niños que fracasaban en conseguir las cuotas de caucho eran desmembrados. El país llegó a ser uno de los grandes escenarios de los grandes genocidios del siglo, y se estima que 10 millones de africanos perecieron bajo el dominio colonial.

Género: Historia Duración: 59:00

Racism: A History is a three-part British documentary series originally broadcast on BBC Four in March 2007.

It was part of the season of programmes broadcast on the BBC marking the 200th anniversary of the Slave Trade Act 1807, a landmark piece of legislation which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire. The series explores the impact of racism on a global scale and chronicles the shifts in the perception of race and the history of racism in Europe, the Americas, Australia and Asia. The series was narrated by Sophie Okonedo.

The series was researched and prepared by the BBC to mark the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Britain (which did not abolish slavery itself) and consists of a chronology of events beginning with the invention of the concept of race in the 17th century as a result of colonisation and slavery and ending in the continued struggle for equal rights that still goes on. The story line narrated by Sophie Okonedo is illustrated by photographs, dramatic representations and on-site filming and is liberally interspersed with interviews with leading researchers and witnesses.

"A Savage Legacy" Tim Robinson 4 April 2007
Examines the impact of racism in the 20th century. By 1900 European colonial expansion had reached deep into the heart of Africa. Under the rule of King Leopold II, the Belgian Congo was turned into a vast rubber plantation. Men, women and children who failed to gather their latex quotas would have their limbs dismembered. The country became the scene of one of the century's greatest racial genocides, as an estimated 10 million Africans perished under colonial rule.

Experts interviewed
Manning Marable

Anthony Appiah

James Allen

Michael Eric Dyson

Thomas Pakenham

Adam Hochschild

Dr Bambi Ceuppens

Prof Deborah Posel

Pallo Jordan

Dr Barney Pityana

Simeon Wright

Hazel Carby

Lee Jasper

Doreen Lawrence

Prof Paul Gilroy

Synopsis
The final episode begins with the abolition of slavery in the US in 1865 after which black people were denied the vote, remained impoverished and became victim to violence and murder if they resisted racism. Instead of slavery there was Sharecropping, a system that left black people in permanent debt to the landowners. Examinations for the vote were introduced and the Jim Crow laws became the norm for segregation. At the heart of this was a system of political and economic terror with lynching as its most powerful weapon. Often the killing and torture took place to the amusement of large crowds of spectators, and postcards of the proceedings sold throughout the States.

The lynching of 17-year-old Jess Washington in 1916 is described in detail, as are riots and murders like the Tulsa race riot of 1921. As James Allen says in regard to why these events have faded from human memory: "White America has maintained to this day control of the history of racial violence as victors. Its as if we live in an occupied country intellectually and as long as white America retains the power and maintains the myth of moral superiority the history will never become fully public and be written into our national conscience." Besides this, black people were characterised as buffoons in traditions like the Blackface.

In the name of civilising the African 90% of Africa was divided among the European powers. Leopold II of Belgium set out to become personally wealthy through his seizure of the Congo, where extreme violence, mutilation and other coercive methods forced the local people to obtain rubber and other raw materials. Between 1880 and 1920 about 10 million people, were killed, yet Leopold built an opulent museum to the colonisation of the Congo, which became the venue of one of the first so-called Human zoos that toured Europe throughout the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century.

Then the words genocide, holocaust and racism became used in connection with the Nazi treatment of the Jews and it became clear that these were abhorrent. However, it did not change the way things were done towards people of colour.

In South Africa the system of racial classification did not have the intention of exterminating the black population created a bureaucracy to determine and enforce access to resources along racial lines. This included an illusory face of democracy which enabled the government to obtain the support of international governments. After the Sharpeville massacre, the banning of the ANC and arrest of Nelson Mandela, the attacks became increasingly violent and deaths mounted up. In 1976 student riots led to many schoolchildren being killed as well as Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko. Practically every family in South Africa was in some way affected by the killings and torture.

It comes as no surprise that many countries supported South Africa. In the United States African American soldiers returning from the war in 1946 were lynched at the rate of one a week. Protests led finally to the passing of anti-lynching laws. When schools were desegregated, violence erupted, resulting in the death of 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955, the photo of whose mutilated face, testimony of extreme viciousness and hate, bore witness of the white man's savagery towards blacks. Four months later the Civil Rights movement was born, having to deal with years of violent resistance and the murder of two of its leaders, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. However, even the civil rights legislation could not alleviate the ubiquitous poverty.

Britain's race riots and racial controversy led to the Race Relations Act of 1968 and, in retaliation, the Rivers of Blood speech of Enoch Powell. Many years of aggressive policing followed as the new generation of young black men fought for their rights. Finally the murder of Stephen Lawrence and subsequent failure of the legal system to deal appropriately with the investigation proved that Institutionalised racism was part of the problem.

The William Macpherson report identified Institutional racism as a situation ““where you have no overt policy saying no one is discriminated against, but all the outcomes of your operations are overtly discriminatory. It is the culture of racism within an organisation that overpowers the formal commitment to equality that produces the racist outcomes." Nevertheless the situation of economic and social inequality of black people in the UK still persists.

Across the world racial inequality remains as it was with the majority of white people living relatively well-to-do lives and the majority of black people in abject poverty. In the United States, Color-blind racism consists in three institutions - mass unemployment, mass incarceration and mass disenfranchisement. Of the 2.3 million prisoners in the US, half are black. These, just like ex-convicts, cannot vote for the rest of their lives.

Finally we hear the story of The Bell Curve, a bestseller that claimed that black people's poor performance in IQ tests proved their intellectual inferiority. Criticism of this has been given little attention. The book's research was funded by the Pioneer Fund and underpins racial eugenics. Racial privilege endures, continuing to shape destinies the world over.

SOURCES
http://www.area-documental.com/player.php?titulo=Un%20Legado%20Salvaje
http://217.160.176.9/comun/videos/Racism%20_A%20History3of3.mp4
BBC_Four

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