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Night Will Fall - Perché non scenda la notte. DOCUMENTARIO 2014

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Tags: Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein: Night Will Fall - Una Noche en el Holocausto - La notte dell'olocausto Night Will Fall - Perché non scenda la notte. DOCUMENTARIO 2014 Un film di André Singer. Con Alfred Hitchcock   Sidney Bernstein Documentario   - Gran Bretagna 2014. Alcuni ricercatori rinvengono un filmato risalente alla seconda guerra mondiale che si scopre essere un documentario girato da Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein nel 1945 sui campi di concentramento tedeschi. Film documentario recentemente riscoperto e riadattato   girato nel 1945 dal regista Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein   che in seguito divenne il fondatore di Granada Televisione   sui campi di concentramento nazisti liberate dalle forze alleate. Con immagini di repertorio girato tra gli altri   dai militari inglesi   sovietici e degli Stati Uniti   un documento con il fine ultimo di mostrare le prove dei terribili crimini dei nazisti nei campi di sterminio. Nonostante il supporto iniziale per il progetto dei governi degli Stati Uniti e la Gran Bretagna   il film è stato accantonato e dimenticato fino a quando   70 anni dopo   è stato restaurato e completato da un'iniziativa Imperial War Museum. Un documentario diretto da André Singer   produttore esecutivo del documentario acclamato "l'atto di uccidere". Film on the recently discovered documentary   filmed in 1945 by director Alfred Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein   which later became the founder of Granada Television- on the Nazi concentration camps liberated by Allied forces. With archival footage filmed among others by the British   Soviet and US military   a document with the ultimate aim to show evidence of the terrible crimes of the Nazis in the death camps. Despite the initial support for the project of the governments of the US and Britain   the film was shelved and forgotten until   70 years later   it was restored and completed by Imperial War Museum initiative. A documentary directed by André Singer   executive producer of the acclaimed documentary "the act of killing". Film sobre el recientemente descubierto documental   rodado en 1945 por el director Alfred Hitchcock y Sidney Bernstein -que luego sería fundador de Granada Television-   sobre los campos de concentración nazis liberados por las fuerzas aliadas. Con imágenes de archivo rodadas entre otros por el ejército británico   soviético y norteamericano   un documento con el fin último de mostrar las evidencias de los terribles crímenes de los nazis en los campos de exterminio. A pesar del apoyo inicial al proyecto de los gobiernos de Estados Unidos e Inglaterra   el film fue archivado y olvidado hasta que   70 años después   fue restaurado y completado por iniciativa del Museo Imperial War. Un documental dirigido por André Singer   productor ejecutivo del aclamado documental “The Act of Killing”. --- Night Will Fall is a 2014 documentary film directed by Andre Singer that chronicles the making of the 1945 British government documentary German Concentration Camps Factual Survey. The 1945 documentary   which showed gruesome scenes from newly liberated Nazi concentration camps   languished in British archives for nearly seven decades and was only recently completed. The 1945 documentary   based on the work of combat cameramen serving with the armed forces and newsreel footage   was produced by Sidney Bernstein   then a British government official   with participation by Alfred Hitchcock. About 12 minutes of footage in this 75-minute film is from the earlier documentary. The title of the film was derived from a line of narration in the 1945 documentary: “Unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach   night will fall.” Synopsis A British Army bulldozer pushes bodies into a mass grave at Belsen   April 19   1945 The film intersperses documentary film from German Concentration Camps Factual Survey   the 1945 documentary   with recent interviews with survivors and liberators. The producers   editors and cameramen who produced the 1945 documentary are featured   and its long delay is explored. As the film begins   Allied forces liberate the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The camp commander   Josef Kramer   and the camp guards are taken as POWs. Other camps are shown being liberated   including Auschwitz and Majdanek in Poland   utilizing footage from Soviet cameramen that had been previously dismissed as atrocity propaganda. Civilians and German servicemen are shown being forced to tour the camps   past gruesome displays   including shrunken skulls. Film clips are shown of interviews with survivors: Anita Lasker-Wallfisch;[4] Eva Mozes Kor tells about the sight of soldiers in white camouflage uniforms   liberating the camp while it snowed   and the soldiers giving prisoners chocolate   cookies and hugs. Among the interviewed survivors is Branko Lustig   producer of Schindler's List   [4] who speaks of how liberation brought soldiers playing bagpipes. At the time   Lustig was so weak he could not raise his body to look out the window   and he thinks that he is about to die   and he thought bagpipe music he was hearing was the music of angels. Lustig theorizes that the 1945 documentary was shelved for political reasons   saying “At this time   the Brits had enough problems with the Jews   ”[4] a reference to the situation at the time in Palestine   then a League of Nations mandate under British control. The documentary includes a recording of an interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his involvement in the project   and clips of interviews with cameramen (who filmed at concentration camps after   or during   liberation   and recounts the production of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey   which included the assembling of a team that included "perhaps the best known film editor in London   ' Stewart McAllister   Hitchcock and Richard Crossman. Background and production The footage that first inspired the film came from the soldiers who liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The footage became a part of the evidence in the Nuremberg trials.[5] Based on this footage and footage from other camps   the 1945 documentary was initiated by Sidney Bernstein   then with the British Ministry of Information   to document for the German public the crimes of the Nazis at their concentration camps. Bernstein brought in Richard Crossman to write the film's narration and had Alfred Hitchcock flown over from Hollywood to advise on the structure. After production was initiated   the British government shelved the film without showing it to the public   and questions remain whether they purposefully suppressed it for political reasons or whether they determined that other projects would be more effective in the de-Nazification process.[4] Andre Singer   director of Night Will Fall   said in a media interview that after the war ended in Europe in May 1945   "government priorities shifted [in Britain]. What seemed like a good idea in 1945 became a problem by June and July." The British needed the German people to rebuild their country   and the film would not have contributed to that. There was also a concern that "it would provoke most sympathy for the Jewish refugees still in the camps after the war [who] wanted to go to Palestine. The British were having problems with nascent Zionism and felt the film would be unhelpful."[1] Adaptations Later in 1945   the 22-minute short film Death Mills was produced by Billy Wilder for U.S. government authorities   with the German version   directed by Hanus Burger   shown to German audiences in the American occupation zone in January 1946. Five of the planned six reels of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey were released in 1984 as Memory of the Camps   which was televised in the US   a year later.[1] Restoration and Night Will Fall The Imperial War Museum received the footage and script in 1952   and in 2008 started restoration of the 1945 documentary.[6] The work was completed in time for its world debut at the Berlin International Film Festival in early 2014. Night Will Fall's director was introduced to the project by Sally Angel   who worked at the Imperial War Museum. She produced the film with Brett Ratner.[1] The formats of the footage from 1945 includes black and white 35 mm   and color 16 mm film stock. The production companies involved in the film were from Great Britain   Israel   Germany   the United States and Denmark. Critical reaction The film received a generally positive reaction from critics. Variety called it a "powerful   must-see documentary." In The Guardian   critic Peter Bradshaw said the film shows "images which I have certainly never seen before. It exposes once again the obscenity of Holocaust denial. This is an extraordinary record. But be warned. Once seen   these images cannot be unseen." The New York Times called it "not a film you’re likely to forget   " and that "what the new film accomplishes   more than anything else   is to make you wish you could see the original." The film's score   composed by Nicholas Singer   was nominated for Best Composition in a Feature Film at the 2015 UK Music and Sound Awards. The film won the Royal Television Society award for History in 2016 where it was cited as "A landmark film   an affirmation of the importance of television as a medium of truth and a document of record in itself.”.[9] It also won a Peabody Award in New York in April 2016. Screenings Night Will Fall aired on the U.K.'s Channel 4 on 24 January 2015 as a single continuous programme   without any commercial breaks. It aired on major networks around the world during the week of 27 January   Holocaust Remembrance Day   the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. It was broadcast by Swedish SVT on 26 January 2015   and also was broadcast by NRK three times in January 2015   and also was broadcast by HBO in the United States. SOURCES https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6fFCCIeiec http://www.rai.tv/dl/RaiTV/programmi/media/ContentItem-0af23bc4-92db-48da-b655-e608862ec700.html  

Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein: Night Will Fall - Una Noche en el Holocausto - La notte dell'olocausto Night Will Fall - Perché non scenda la notte. DOCUMENTARIO 2014 Un film di André Singer. Con Alfred Hitchcock, Sidney Bernstein Documentario, - Gran Bretagna 2014. Alcuni ricercatori rinvengono un filmato risalente alla seconda guerra mondiale che si scopre essere un documentario girato da Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein nel 1945 sui campi di concentramento tedeschi. Film documentario recentemente riscoperto e riadattato, girato nel 1945 dal regista Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein, che in seguito divenne il fondatore di Granada Televisione, sui campi di concentramento nazisti liberate dalle forze alleate. Con immagini di repertorio girato tra gli altri, dai militari inglesi, sovietici e degli Stati Uniti, un documento con il fine ultimo di mostrare le prove dei terribili crimini dei nazisti nei campi di sterminio. Nonostante il supporto iniziale per il progetto dei governi degli Stati Uniti e la Gran Bretagna, il film è stato accantonato e dimenticato fino a quando, 70 anni dopo, è stato restaurato e completato da un'iniziativa Imperial War Museum. Un documentario diretto da André Singer, produttore esecutivo del documentario acclamato "l'atto di uccidere". Film on the recently discovered documentary, filmed in 1945 by director Alfred Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein, which later became the founder of Granada Television- on the Nazi concentration camps liberated by Allied forces. With archival footage filmed among others by the British, Soviet and US military, a document with the ultimate aim to show evidence of the terrible crimes of the Nazis in the death camps. Despite the initial support for the project of the governments of the US and Britain, the film was shelved and forgotten until, 70 years later, it was restored and completed by Imperial War Museum initiative. A documentary directed by André Singer, executive producer of the acclaimed documentary "the act of killing". Film sobre el recientemente descubierto documental, rodado en 1945 por el director Alfred Hitchcock y Sidney Bernstein -que luego sería fundador de Granada Television-, sobre los campos de concentración nazis liberados por las fuerzas aliadas. Con imágenes de archivo rodadas entre otros por el ejército británico, soviético y norteamericano, un documento con el fin último de mostrar las evidencias de los terribles crímenes de los nazis en los campos de exterminio. A pesar del apoyo inicial al proyecto de los gobiernos de Estados Unidos e Inglaterra, el film fue archivado y olvidado hasta que, 70 años después, fue restaurado y completado por iniciativa del Museo Imperial War. Un documental dirigido por André Singer, productor ejecutivo del aclamado documental “The Act of Killing”. --- Night Will Fall is a 2014 documentary film directed by Andre Singer that chronicles the making of the 1945 British government documentary German Concentration Camps Factual Survey. The 1945 documentary, which showed gruesome scenes from newly liberated Nazi concentration camps, languished in British archives for nearly seven decades and was only recently completed. The 1945 documentary, based on the work of combat cameramen serving with the armed forces and newsreel footage, was produced by Sidney Bernstein, then a British government official, with participation by Alfred Hitchcock. About 12 minutes of footage in this 75-minute film is from the earlier documentary. The title of the film was derived from a line of narration in the 1945 documentary: “Unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach, night will fall.” Synopsis A British Army bulldozer pushes bodies into a mass grave at Belsen, April 19, 1945 The film intersperses documentary film from German Concentration Camps Factual Survey, the 1945 documentary, with recent interviews with survivors and liberators. The producers, editors and cameramen who produced the 1945 documentary are featured, and its long delay is explored. As the film begins, Allied forces liberate the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The camp commander, Josef Kramer, and the camp guards are taken as POWs. Other camps are shown being liberated, including Auschwitz and Majdanek in Poland, utilizing footage from Soviet cameramen that had been previously dismissed as atrocity propaganda. Civilians and German servicemen are shown being forced to tour the camps, past gruesome displays, including shrunken skulls. Film clips are shown of interviews with survivors: Anita Lasker-Wallfisch;[4] Eva Mozes Kor tells about the sight of soldiers in white camouflage uniforms, liberating the camp while it snowed, and the soldiers giving prisoners chocolate, cookies and hugs. Among the interviewed survivors is Branko Lustig, producer of Schindler's List,[4] who speaks of how liberation brought soldiers playing bagpipes. At the time, Lustig was so weak he could not raise his body to look out the window, and he thinks that he is about to die, and he thought bagpipe music he was hearing was the music of angels. Lustig theorizes that the 1945 documentary was shelved for political reasons, saying “At this time, the Brits had enough problems with the Jews,”[4] a reference to the situation at the time in Palestine, then a League of Nations mandate under British control. The documentary includes a recording of an interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his involvement in the project, and clips of interviews with cameramen (who filmed at concentration camps after, or during, liberation, and recounts the production of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey, which included the assembling of a team that included "perhaps the best known film editor in London,' Stewart McAllister, Hitchcock and Richard Crossman. Background and production The footage that first inspired the film came from the soldiers who liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The footage became a part of the evidence in the Nuremberg trials.[5] Based on this footage and footage from other camps, the 1945 documentary was initiated by Sidney Bernstein, then with the British Ministry of Information, to document for the German public the crimes of the Nazis at their concentration camps. Bernstein brought in Richard Crossman to write the film's narration and had Alfred Hitchcock flown over from Hollywood to advise on the structure. After production was initiated, the British government shelved the film without showing it to the public, and questions remain whether they purposefully suppressed it for political reasons or whether they determined that other projects would be more effective in the de-Nazification process.[4] Andre Singer, director of Night Will Fall, said in a media interview that after the war ended in Europe in May 1945, "government priorities shifted [in Britain]. What seemed like a good idea in 1945 became a problem by June and July." The British needed the German people to rebuild their country, and the film would not have contributed to that. There was also a concern that "it would provoke most sympathy for the Jewish refugees still in the camps after the war [who] wanted to go to Palestine. The British were having problems with nascent Zionism and felt the film would be unhelpful."[1] Adaptations Later in 1945, the 22-minute short film Death Mills was produced by Billy Wilder for U.S. government authorities, with the German version, directed by Hanus Burger, shown to German audiences in the American occupation zone in January 1946. Five of the planned six reels of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey were released in 1984 as Memory of the Camps, which was televised in the US, a year later.[1] Restoration and Night Will Fall The Imperial War Museum received the footage and script in 1952, and in 2008 started restoration of the 1945 documentary.[6] The work was completed in time for its world debut at the Berlin International Film Festival in early 2014. Night Will Fall's director was introduced to the project by Sally Angel, who worked at the Imperial War Museum. She produced the film with Brett Ratner.[1] The formats of the footage from 1945 includes black and white 35 mm, and color 16 mm film stock. The production companies involved in the film were from Great Britain, Israel, Germany, the United States and Denmark. Critical reaction The film received a generally positive reaction from critics. Variety called it a "powerful, must-see documentary." In The Guardian, critic Peter Bradshaw said the film shows "images which I have certainly never seen before. It exposes once again the obscenity of Holocaust denial. This is an extraordinary record. But be warned. Once seen, these images cannot be unseen." The New York Times called it "not a film you’re likely to forget," and that "what the new film accomplishes, more than anything else, is to make you wish you could see the original." The film's score, composed by Nicholas Singer, was nominated for Best Composition in a Feature Film at the 2015 UK Music and Sound Awards. The film won the Royal Television Society award for History in 2016 where it was cited as "A landmark film, an affirmation of the importance of television as a medium of truth and a document of record in itself.”.[9] It also won a Peabody Award in New York in April 2016. Screenings Night Will Fall aired on the U.K.'s Channel 4 on 24 January 2015 as a single continuous programme, without any commercial breaks. It aired on major networks around the world during the week of 27 January, Holocaust Remembrance Day, the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. It was broadcast by Swedish SVT on 26 January 2015, and also was broadcast by NRK three times in January 2015, and also was broadcast by HBO in the United States. SOURCES https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6fFCCIeiec http://www.rai.tv/dl/RaiTV/programmi/media/ContentItem-0af23bc4-92db-48da-b655-e608862ec700.html

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oseido 07/19/2016

Night Will Fall - La notte dell'olocausto -DOCUMENTARIO IMMAGINI DI REPERTORIONight Will Fall - La notte dell'olocausto -DOCUMENTARIO IMMAGINI DI REPERTORIOAlfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein: Night Will Fall - Una Noche en el Holocausto - La notte dell'olocausto

Night Will Fall - La notte dell'olocausto - DOCUMENTARIO IMMAGINI DI REPERTORIO
http://agorastrea.dyndns.info/videos/490/night-will-fall-perch-non-scenda-la-notte-documentario-2014/

Night Will Fall - Perché non scenda la notte. DOCUMENTARIO 2014
Un film di André Singer. Con Alfred Hitchcock, Sidney Bernstein Documentario, - Gran Bretagna 2014.

Alcuni ricercatori rinvengono un filmato risalente alla seconda guerra mondiale che si scopre essere un documentario girato da Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney

Bernstein nel 1945 sui campi di concentramento tedeschi.

Film documentario recentemente riscoperto e riadattato, girato nel 1945 dal regista Alfred Hitchcock e Sidney Bernstein, che in seguito divenne il

fondatore di Granada Televisione, sui campi di concentramento nazisti liberate dalle forze alleate. Con immagini di repertorio girato tra gli altri, dai

militari inglesi, sovietici e degli Stati Uniti, un documento con il fine ultimo di mostrare le prove dei terribili crimini dei nazisti nei campi di

sterminio. Nonostante il supporto iniziale per il progetto dei governi degli Stati Uniti e la Gran Bretagna, il film è stato accantonato e dimenticato fino

a quando, 70 anni dopo, è stato restaurato e completato da un'iniziativa Imperial War Museum. Un documentario diretto da André Singer, produttore esecutivo

del documentario acclamato "l'atto di uccidere".

Film on the recently discovered documentary, filmed in 1945 by director Alfred Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein, which later became the founder of Granada

Television- on the Nazi concentration camps liberated by Allied forces. With archival footage filmed among others by the British, Soviet and US military, a

document with the ultimate aim to show evidence of the terrible crimes of the Nazis in the death camps. Despite the initial support for the project of the

governments of the US and Britain, the film was shelved and forgotten until, 70 years later, it was restored and completed by Imperial War Museum

initiative. A documentary directed by André Singer, executive producer of the acclaimed documentary "the act of killing".

Film sobre el recientemente descubierto documental, rodado en 1945 por el director Alfred Hitchcock y Sidney Bernstein -que luego sería fundador de Granada

Television-, sobre los campos de concentración nazis liberados por las fuerzas aliadas. Con imágenes de archivo rodadas entre otros por el ejército

británico, soviético y norteamericano, un documento con el fin último de mostrar las evidencias de los terribles crímenes de los nazis en los campos de

exterminio. A pesar del apoyo inicial al proyecto de los gobiernos de Estados Unidos e Inglaterra, el film fue archivado y olvidado hasta que, 70 años

después, fue restaurado y completado por iniciativa del Museo Imperial War. Un documental dirigido por André Singer, productor ejecutivo del aclamado

documental “The Act of Killing”.

---

Night Will Fall is a 2014 documentary film directed by Andre Singer that chronicles the making of the 1945 British government documentary German

Concentration Camps Factual Survey. The 1945 documentary, which showed gruesome scenes from newly liberated Nazi concentration camps, languished in British

archives for nearly seven decades and was only recently completed.

The 1945 documentary, based on the work of combat cameramen serving with the armed forces and newsreel footage, was produced by Sidney Bernstein, then a

British government official, with participation by Alfred Hitchcock. About 12 minutes of footage in this 75-minute film is from the earlier documentary.

The title of the film was derived from a line of narration in the 1945 documentary: “Unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach, night will

fall.”


Synopsis

A British Army bulldozer pushes bodies into a mass grave at Belsen, April 19, 1945
The film intersperses documentary film from German Concentration Camps Factual Survey, the 1945 documentary, with recent interviews with survivors and

liberators. The producers, editors and cameramen who produced the 1945 documentary are featured, and its long delay is explored.

As the film begins, Allied forces liberate the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The camp commander, Josef Kramer, and the camp guards are taken as POWs.

Other camps are shown being liberated, including Auschwitz and Majdanek in Poland, utilizing footage from Soviet cameramen that had been previously

dismissed as atrocity propaganda. Civilians and German servicemen are shown being forced to tour the camps, past gruesome displays, including shrunken

skulls.

Film clips are shown of interviews with survivors: Anita Lasker-Wallfisch;[4] Eva Mozes Kor tells about the sight of soldiers in white camouflage uniforms,

liberating the camp while it snowed, and the soldiers giving prisoners chocolate, cookies and hugs.

Among the interviewed survivors is Branko Lustig, producer of Schindler's List,[4] who speaks of how liberation brought soldiers playing bagpipes. At the

time, Lustig was so weak he could not raise his body to look out the window, and he thinks that he is about to die, and he thought bagpipe music he was

hearing was the music of angels. Lustig theorizes that the 1945 documentary was shelved for political reasons, saying “At this time, the Brits had enough

problems with the Jews,”[4] a reference to the situation at the time in Palestine, then a League of Nations mandate under British control.

The documentary includes a recording of an interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his involvement in the project, and clips of interviews with cameramen (who

filmed at concentration camps after, or during, liberation, and recounts the production of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey, which included the

assembling of a team that included "perhaps the best known film editor in London,' Stewart McAllister, Hitchcock and Richard Crossman.

Background and production
The footage that first inspired the film came from the soldiers who liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The footage became a part of the

evidence in the Nuremberg trials.[5] Based on this footage and footage from other camps, the 1945 documentary was initiated by Sidney Bernstein, then with

the British Ministry of Information, to document for the German public the crimes of the Nazis at their concentration camps. Bernstein brought in Richard

Crossman to write the film's narration and had Alfred Hitchcock flown over from Hollywood to advise on the structure. After production was initiated, the

British government shelved the film without showing it to the public, and questions remain whether they purposefully suppressed it for political reasons or

whether they determined that other projects would be more effective in the de-Nazification process.[4]

Andre Singer, director of Night Will Fall, said in a media interview that after the war ended in Europe in May 1945, "government priorities shifted [in

Britain]. What seemed like a good idea in 1945 became a problem by June and July." The British needed the German people to rebuild their country, and the

film would not have contributed to that. There was also a concern that "it would provoke most sympathy for the Jewish refugees still in the camps after the

war [who] wanted to go to Palestine. The British were having problems with nascent Zionism and felt the film would be unhelpful."[1]

Adaptations
Later in 1945, the 22-minute short film Death Mills was produced by Billy Wilder for U.S. government authorities, with the German version, directed by

Hanus Burger, shown to German audiences in the American occupation zone in January 1946.

Five of the planned six reels of German Concentration Camps Factual Survey were released in 1984 as Memory of the Camps, which was televised in the US, a

year later.[1]

Restoration and Night Will Fall
The Imperial War Museum received the footage and script in 1952, and in 2008 started restoration of the 1945 documentary.[6] The work was completed in time

for its world debut at the Berlin International Film Festival in early 2014.

Night Will Fall's director was introduced to the project by Sally Angel, who worked at the Imperial War Museum. She produced the film with Brett Ratner.[1]

The formats of the footage from 1945 includes black and white 35 mm, and color 16 mm film stock. The production companies involved in the film were from

Great Britain, Israel, Germany, the United States and Denmark.

Critical reaction
The film received a generally positive reaction from critics. Variety called it a "powerful, must-see documentary." In The Guardian, critic Peter Bradshaw

said the film shows "images which I have certainly never seen before. It exposes once again the obscenity of Holocaust denial. This is an extraordinary

record. But be warned. Once seen, these images cannot be unseen." The New York Times called it "not a film you’re likely to forget," and that "what the new

film accomplishes, more than anything else, is to make you wish you could see the original." The film's score, composed by Nicholas Singer, was nominated

for Best Composition in a Feature Film at the 2015 UK Music and Sound Awards. The film won the Royal Television Society award for History in 2016 where it

was cited as "A landmark film, an affirmation of the importance of television as a medium of truth and a document of record in itself.”.[9] It also won a

Peabody Award in New York in April 2016.

Screenings
Night Will Fall aired on the U.K.'s Channel 4 on 24 January 2015 as a single continuous programme, without any commercial breaks. It aired on major

networks around the world during the week of 27 January, Holocaust Remembrance Day, the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. It was broadcast

by Swedish SVT on 26 January 2015, and also was broadcast by NRK three times in January 2015, and also was broadcast by HBO in the United States.

SOURCES
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6fFCCIeiec
http://www.rai.tv/dl/RaiTV/programmi/media/ContentItem-0af23bc4-92db-48da-b655-e608862ec700.html

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